Tag Archives: Education

How To Be My Favorite Teacher

I wrote this post several years ago for a different blog. In talking to some friends tonight, I was inspired to dig it up, re-polish it, and publish it again. I still think the idea is great, and I hope to teach at some point in my future. I think this idea works, and it’s fun to talk about. So here we go. Gamification. 

Gamification is not a word I just invented. While it is a newer word (first coined in 2002), it is a real thing.

If you try to gamify something (ok…I may have made that one up), you apply gaming principles to something that is not a game in order to create a better experience, enhance participation, or make something more enjoyable for others.

You may be familiar with many of the modern applications of gamification. Achievement badges, leaderboards, challenges, and progress bars are all common examples. Many iPhone apps have these features to keep you playing (talking to you, Farmville). Every xBox game comes with a list of achievements to unlock, intended to encourage players to continue playing the game even after they have beaten it once or twice.

Turning chores into a game certainly makes them more entertaining. Why not teach classes in the same way? Please don’t tell me that college courses currently place an emphasis on attendance and participation. As a system, the college lecture format is dated and often amazingly inefficient (especially considering the price many students pay to attend college).

So here is my idea. I am going to pretend that I am a Chemistry professor, teaching a class called “Introduction to Chemistry” for incoming freshman science majors. I have 400 students in my class. The class teaches basic chemistry, and most of my students will continue to take harder chemistry classes later in their academic careers, so I can assume they are at least reasonably motivated to do well in this course

I will format my class somewhat traditionally:
5 Tests x 100 pts each
5 Quizzes x 10pts each
5 Pop Quizzes x 10pts each
5 HW Assignments x 40pts each
1 Final @ 200pts.

=1000 points total. In my experience as a science major, this is a fairly common syllabus. Here’s where I change it up. I will also distribute a “Game Card” to each student. I would probably create a point system called “moles” or something dorky like that. You could achieve up to 100 mole points in the semester, perhaps. Some you can get automatically, others would require direct effort. At the end of the semester, your mole points are converted to extra credit points. For the math wizards, that’s 10% extra credit available for free. A whole letter grade.

How do you get mole points? Stuff like this..

Attend Office Hours and Ask Questions- 5 Mole Points
Most students will never attend office hours and ask for help, but will instead futilely struggle, search the internet, and ask friends. I’m no expert, but I bet that getting individual help from a professor will improve classroom performance.

Achieve 90% or Greater on an Exam- 10 Mole Points
This rewards students who perform well. It offers a clear motivation to excel on exams. You could argue that students who receive this achievement don’t need it, as they are already smarter than the average bear. I argue that a C student could conceivably study hard, get a 90%, and would deserve a 10pt bonus for his effort. Also, see next achievement.

Improve Your Test Score by 10% or More -10 Mole Points
This one is not for the smart kids. If you scored a 94% on my first exam, you got the previous achievement and don’t really have hope for this one. For the C student above, who maybe got a 75% on the first exam, this doubles the incentive to buckle down and perform better on the next test.

Other incentives could include activities like writing a short report on a current research topic that you find interesting, exposing the student to some practical applications of their studies while forcing them to take some initiative and break new ground. Scheduling an appointment with a tutoring service (if the school supports one-mine does) during the week before a test will help their test score and increase retention. Other “achievements” would reward class attendance, for example, or perhaps encourage participation. I thought about including one that would reward students for finding an error that I would purposefully include on the slides each week, so that they are encouraged to ask questions and think critically about what I write instead of blindly memorizing it.

The weather is awful, can't go to class The weather is beautiful, can't waste it in class  Lazy College Senior

There is a valid argument against my little game I created. Students would need to have a level of motivation and achievement to do more than just immediately lose the “game board” I gave them on my first day of class. Also, the teachers likely to implement this game would be good teachers already. They would teach dynamically, interact with students, and have their own ways to implement all of the same things I am attempting to do with my game. 

I think that’s fantastic. Maybe they use part of my games, maybe they use their own system. Whatever. I think that a system like this (or similar to it) would improve the classroom experience for teachers and students alike.

Facets of gamification are already working. The Khan Academy incorporates these ideas into their online lessons. At the end of the day, doing your chemistry homework will never be as fun as playing real games, pursuing hobbies, or spending time with friends. If these ideas will give people extra motivation, and if that extra motivation translates to academic success, then I think they are worth pursuing. It may not be incredibly fun, but there are much worse games to play.

P.S. I first published this in 2011, so the Hunger Games reference was less dated. Also, I think I am a better writer now, but I’ll let you decide.

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Everything Wrong With College

It’s been another busy week of medical school for me. We are preparing for our comprehensive pharmacology exam, along with finishing up final exams in toxicology and microbes. There is plenty of studying to be doing, and I have also been busy working on a final presentation for my clinical elective. Yesterday, in fact, I spent my last day at the dermatology clinic. It just isn’t a Wednesday until I help the resident freeze genital warts. Too much info? That’s medical school for you 🙂 Thankfully, I gave an “superb” presentation (on a subject that isn’t even a tiny bit interesting, so I’ll leave that part out) so it’s safe to assume I earned at least a letter of recommendation from her. Sweet. I take the time tonight to write about education, specifically college, so that I can piece together a short narrative describing not only the problems with college education today, but also what it means to Americans as a whole.

Like most twenty somethings, I grew up with a pretty clear picture of what success in life looked like. It came from teachers, parents, school counselors, and other adults, but the message was the same: successful people went to college, got a degree, and then earned more money and were happier because they did. The not-so-subtle indication was that I, too, should go to college if I wanted to be happy in life. Smart people went to college, I was told, or at least college made people smart. I don’t know when this idea was perpetuated on Americans, but I suspect it was around my parents generation. My dad didn’t go to college, although the pressure to get a degree certainly existed when he graduated high school.

I played the game very successfully. After graduating top of my high school class, I took a full ride scholarship to a good state school. According to the “rules” I was taught when I was younger, I had won the game. I was virtually guaranteed four years of education and a degree of my choice (with no debt upon graduation). Of course, I started college in 2009. This was not a good time for the economy, and college graduates suffered for it. I spent my college years reading news stories about how hard it was for grads to find a job, and feeling secretly glad that I had a few years for the economy to turn around before I graduated. Despite this, my university set enrollment records for all eight semesters I attended. Of course, now I am in medical school and have nearly a decade of school still ahead of me, so take that with a grain of salt.

So now I wonder why people still rush to take out loans and attend school for degrees they may never use. I watched many friends amass huge debts and drop out after 3 years. I saw people waste huge amounts of time, money, and energy, and now they have nothing to show for it. I saw friends take a semester off and 4 years later wish they had stuck with it. So here are some of the things I wish people would really know about college.

1) Colleges Are Businesses

dollar for dollar

We are coming up on the time of year when high school seniors everywhere begin posting acceptance letters on Facebook, listing the college/university they plan to attend. That’s great for them, but it perpetuates a myth that sucks people in every year: that colleges are somehow exclusive. To put it another way, University of _______ actually wants you to attend their school. There are a small handful of uber elite schools that are competitive to gain admittance (MIT, Harvard, etc). The other 99% of schools want you to attend because they need your tuition to make money. It doesn’t stop there, either. They need your fees, parking passes, textbook purchases, and other expenses as well. I’m not saying that these schools aren’t trying to give you a stellar education. Just know that they want to give you a great education and also make money. But mostly the money.

2) College Is Not About You

This will be shocking to anyone who has seen any marketing materials for any school anywhere, been to college, or even heard anything about college, but I think it’s crazy that it goes unrecognized. Think about any university advertisement, and it’s usually some combination of the following ideas:

“Follow YOUR passion, pursue YOUR dreams”

“Create YOUR OWN major”

“Classes that fit YOUR schedule”

This was the third result after Googling “University Brochures”.

It’s like the whole school is expressly designed to help you along in life. False. The school wants you to pay money to them, or at least do something awesome later so they can get the publicity. Of course they’ll let you take a semester off. Of course they’ll let you do your degree in six years instead of four. Of course they offer online classes. They are a business and they’ll do what it takes to earn your tuition dollars.

If the version of success I learned in school is to be believed, your degree should show that you are qualified, diligent, hardworking, ambitious, or some mixture of those. If your degree is four years long and you are going to “normal” college (not night school or a non-trad), get it done in four years. Chances are that a marketing degree is not your passion, so don’t pretend like it is. Work hard, get your degree, and spend your extra time pursuing your other hobbies and interests. Those are also qualities that define your character, and while they may not be on your CV they will certainly impact your chances at landing your job/achieving your goals after school. This leads me to…

3)  College Can Be a Huge Waste of Time

College is not hard. You may hate me for saying that, but I’m telling the truth here. My degree was in Molecular Biology and a little bit of Chemistry, and I know that my four years of college were significantly more difficult than any of my peers. How do I know that? Well, I lived with them, and I know I spent way more time in class and studying than they did. So how hard did I work during school? Not that hard. Each semester I attended class for 20 hours a week and studied about 10 hours, sometimes 15 hours. That adds up to less than a normal work week. Also take into account that I lived on campus, so I had no commute. I also ate dorm food from a cafeteria that was 30 seconds from my room. We also went to school for 32 weeks of the year. I spent lots of time exercising, playing video games, and doing lots of whatever I wanted. It was great.

Fact is, college classes should not keep you busy. My class schedule was about as bad as undergraduate schedules can get, and I still managed to work all eight semesters, get married, earn my EMT certification, and complete an Ironman triathlon. My most memorable moments from college have nothing to do with school.

In this sense, I think college is actually bad for many young adults. As a country and a society, we are taking our most energetic young people and forcing them into a 4-year holding pattern. The 18-24 age group is full of young, talented, motivated, technologically competent, people who are the future of our nation. We are bright enough to have terrific ideas, and naive enough to not know when something can’t be done. But we have to attend classes for just long enough each week to not actually get a real job, but not enough class that it’s truly “full time”. Those classes can range from being interesting (wine tasting) to being totally useless (most of my humanities courses), and after 4 (or more) years of sitting through classes, they will finally graduate into the real world, often with crippling debt.

This is the hardest part for me. I am (or at least I was) a perfect candidate for college. I’m naturally curious, enjoy learning, and am prone to obsessively mastering new hobbies and subjects. Yet after four years I had only one or two good professors who actually made the class worth attending, and honestly I was a little burned out. I have thought long and hard about what I could have done with those four years if I could have them back.

4) You won’t learn much during college

This might seem like a continuation of my last point, but it’s not. College classes are still largely taught in a lecture format, often in huge lecture halls. One of the few things I remember from Abnormal Psychology was that students typically remember only 5% of the material presented in lecture format (10% if multimedia graphics are used). This is a bad situation, even if you assume that the professor is awesome and the students care. Small wonder that employers are struggling to find qualified applicants among graduates that they interview. What happened? I thought that undergrad degree was the key to landing a good job? Now that everyone seems to get a degree, I guess not.

College has become like bonus high school. More and more people seem to be going to college, and it hasn’t been working out like we thought it would. Maybe this trend will reverse itself in the next few decades. I will certainly think long and hard before I help my future son finance a $80k degree. I get that college will always be required for some professions (hello medicine, law, etc), and that makes sense (sort of, I will someday write about that too).

It’s not that I’m too good for college, or that our generation is too good for college. It’s just that college isn’t good enough for what it costs. It’s not just the huge debt, it’s the years and time being lost as well.

If a college degree is the vehicle for success, it’s a taxi. It works great for getting you directly from one place to another, but if you just jump in and ride around for four years you’ll be broke and lost.

I need to stop writing now, and this seems like a good place to do it.

Thanks for reading!

As always, feel free to comment below or directly to my face at sortadrwordpress@gmail.com

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