Floating Along

Welcome back to my blog! In reality, I was the one who took a brief hiatus over the holidays, and I don’t regret it at all. I would love to say that I spent my two weeks off deep in thought, drafting blog posts, and learning all of the things I forgot immediately after taking my final exam on December 20th, but that would be a lie. Instead, I spent most of my break at home with family and friends, and the rest of it being as lazy as humanly possible. On the plus side, I am refreshed and ready to tackle another semester of medical school.

Just kidding…I actually laughed after typing that last sentence. Let me do a little catching up on what medical school has done to me recently. In late November we started Pharmacology and Microbiology. I prefer to call it “Bugs and Drugs”. The courses are taught simultaneously, which is actually helpful because we get to learn the organisms that cause disease around the time that we learn the drugs that can treat said disease. I use the word “learn” very loosely here, because really they just throw hundreds of drugs at us and we get to sort out what they do for a few days before the exam. In the week before Christmas we covered around 220 antibiotics, antifungals, cancer therapies, and other drugs in about 4 days before taking an exam on Friday before break. That was my hardest week of medical school yet. While attempting to learn all of those drugs, we also had to learn information on bacteria, viruses, their associated structures and pathology, some information about other organisms (mycobacteria), and take an exam on that the same day as pharmacology. Have you seen Christmas with the Kranks? Remember the scene where Luther is leaving the shop in the beginning and the water canopy breaks, drenching him in water even as he stands in the pouring rain? That was a pretty accurate description of me during this course.

This is not an area of strength for me, either. I had great undergrad anatomy experience to support me during med school anatomy. I did take immunology and pharmacology as well, but both courses were incredibly easy. Most of what I remember from immunology was “viruses are scary”, and I don’t think I remember anything at all from pharmacology. So learning information at the insane pace set by the course directors required long, long days of studying at home. In the winter. In the cold. By myself. Very depressing. But hey, I have passed everything so far, and am 1/8 of the way toward completing my MD.

While talking to an actual doctor, I learned the dirty secret of pharmacology. None of us will remember all of these drugs after this year (I already knew that part). We will really learn them again during third year and beyond, when we begin to prescribe and work with drugs in a practical setting. The goal of this class is to make sure we have heard of these drugs at least once.

In other news, I have now interviewed and presented my own patients. The dermatologist I have been shadowing is letting me see patients (with a resident keeping a close watch). This allows me to demonstrate my complete ignorance of dermatology for both the patients and the residents, but has helped me start to develop my all important “bedside manner”. I have a feeling I will be much better at interviewing and taking histories when I know roughly what I am hoping to find.

Of course, this is kind of what I expected from medical school. I’m busy and I’m challenged, and I like it. At this point in undergrad I was already bored (and still on winter break). The pace is grinding, but is also what keeps school interesting. It’s like sightseeing from a bullet train. While it’s impossible to see everything that flashes by, there are so many interesting things to see that the view is still captivating. Some semesters of undergrad felt like sightseeing from a snowplow.

I have been sending Facebook messages back and forth with a friend who is considering medical school. Most of his questions centered around the difficulty of the classes and exams, the pace, the hours, etc. I understand the worry from potential students, but I don’t understand the doubt. I have never once, even for a second, thought I would fail/drop out/give up during medical school. I would say that trend is strong among my friends as well. Despite the deluge of information and massive investments of time and money, I don’t think anyone is legitimately worried about dropping out. It’s fine to ask “how”, but counterproductive to ask “what if”.  To be honest, most of my classmates are generally happy people. Maybe this is because of our pass/fail system. Maybe our class is different. This is just an honest opinion from what I see on the days I go to class (instead of watching lectures online from home). If you think you can do it, you probably can. Just my opinion. Of course, it wouldn’t hurt to read up on this before you go applying, just in case 🙂

I have other topics I want to write about (vaccinations, antibiotic resistance, books and movies, and a stunning realization I had ordering dinner over break), but I really need to wrap up this little update of a post and call it day.

Thanks for reading!

sortadrwordpress@gmail.com

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